Old Fashioned Dog Names

If you want to give your dog a vintage, classy name, you've come to right place. These are the best old-fashioned dog names you'll find online.

Old Fashioned Dog Names

Tap the arrow to see a name's meaning, and the heart to save it to your shortlist.

names

All Old Fashioned Dog Names

  • Abe
    Harkens back to Lincoln era, less trendy than Fido or Spot nowadays.
  • Colonial roots and Little House on the Prairie vibes scream antiquity!
  • Biblical origins and Little Rascals fame give it a vintage vibe.
  • Ada
    Popular during Victorian times, its usage has significantly dwindled since.
  • Popular during the Victorian era, Addy's popularity has since waned.
  • Originating from Germanic nobility, this moniker screams vintage charm!
  • Victorian era pooches frequently sported this elegant moniker.
  • Popular during Victorian times, it's rarely heard in modern dog parks.
  • Popular in the 1880s, it's now more associated with grannies than puppies.
  • Popular during Victorian times, less common among today's canine companions.
  • Historically favored by royals, this canine moniker harks back to antiquity.
  • Harkens back to Victorian times, rarely heard in modern dog parks.
  • Popular during Victorian times, less common in modern canine nomenclature.
  • Ali
    Harkens back to boxing legend Muhammad Ali's heyday in the 60s.
  • Echoes of medieval knights and ancient Scottish clans resonate in its syllables.
  • Popular during the 19th century, now rarely heard in dog parks.
  • Chipmunk fame aside, its popularity peaked in the 1920s!
  • Popular in Victorian times, this moniker's popularity has since waned.
  • Harkens back to Victorian times, echoing famed aviatrix Earhart's vintage charm.
  • Biblical origins and rarity in modern naming trends give it antiquated charm.
  • Royalty-inspired, harking back to Russian grand duchesses and bygone eras.
  • Scottish roots and beefy connotations harken back to simpler, bygone times.
  • Popular during the Victorian era, its popularity has since waned.
  • Victorian era popularity and cowgirl associations give it a vintage vibe.
  • Echoes a bygone era, reminiscent of Southern belles and classic country songs.
  • Popular during the Victorian era, it's less common in modern canine nomenclature.
  • Derived from ancient Rome, it's rarely heard in modern canine circles.
  • Victorian era gentry often christened their canine companions Arabella.
  • Popularized in early 20th century comics, its usage has since dwindled.
  • Popular in the 1940s, it's now more associated with vintage sitcoms.
  • Art
    Popular during the 60s, it's a relic from the Beatles' era.
  • King Arthur's knights probably had canine companions named after him!
  • Victorian era gentry often favored this dignified moniker for their hounds.
  • Harkens back to yesteryears, echoing vintage charm and classic canine monikers.
  • Hails from Viking lore, rarely heard in modern canine calling circles!
  • Popular in the 60s, this moniker echoes vintage charm and classic elegance.
  • Echoes of Roman emperors and Southern belles, rarely heard in modern kennels.
  • Hails from Roman emperors era, lacks modern canine moniker trends like "Fido".
  • Ava
    This moniker harks back to silver screen siren Ava Gardner's era.
  • Harkens back to medieval times, rarely heard in modern dog parks.
  • Popular in the 90s, this moniker harks back to nostalgic sitcoms.
  • Popular during the cowboy era, this moniker screams Wild West nostalgia.
  • Echoes of yesteryears, this moniker harks back to Dickensian literary classics.
  • Popular during the Flintstones era, this moniker's popularity has since waned.
  • Harkens back to days of yore, rarely heard in modern canine roll-calls.
  • Popular during Victorian times, it's rarely heard in modern dog parks.
  • Bea
    Popular in the 1950s, Bea harks back to vintage sitcom "Golden Girls".
  • Shakespearean roots and scarce modern usage give it a vintage charm.
  • Popular during Victorian times, this canine moniker echoes classic fairy tales.
  • Twilight's vampire romance made this classic canine moniker popular again.
  • Victorian era popularity and Disney's 1991 film keep her nostalgically charming.
  • Popularized in the 70s, this canine moniker now evokes nostalgic charm.
  • Harkens back to Victorian times, like a canine Mr. Darcy!
  • Popular during the 1920s, it echoes the jazz era's charm.
  • Popular in the 70s, it harks back to a classic British butler.
  • Popular in the 1940s, it's a nod to vintage canine monikers.
  • Saints and brandy barrels on Alpine rescue missions scream vintage charm!
  • Popular in the 1920s, it's now more common among grandmas than pups.
  • Popular during the Victorian era, now it's more common for grandmothers!
  • Hails from 19th century France, rarely heard in modern dog parks!
  • Popular during the 1800s, she's a bovine star in nursery rhymes.
  • Popular during the 19th century, it's now more common for cows!
  • Popular during the Little Women era, its usage has significantly dwindled.
  • Popular in the 1930s, this canine moniker echoes vintage Hollywood glamour.
  • Popular in the 1930s, this moniker echoes vintage Hollywood glamour.
  • Popular in the 1920s, it echoes jazz icon Billie Holiday's era.
  • Popular during the 1920s, this moniker echoes flapper-era charm and nostalgia.
  • Popular in the 1940s, this moniker screams vintage chic and classic elegance.
  • Popular in the 1930s, this moniker harks back to simpler times.
  • Harkens back to days of quills, inkwells, and canine literary companions.
  • Evokes images of tweed-clad English gents, not modern, hipster pooches.
  • Popular in the 70s, this moniker echoes a bygone era of disco and bell-bottoms.
  • Popular in the 70s, this liquor-inspired moniker has since lost its fizz.
  • Harkens back to Braxton Hicks contractions, coined in 1872!
  • This moniker harks back to pioneer days, echoing Brigham Young's legacy.
  • Popular in the 1800s, this moniker harks back to vintage canine appellations.
  • Echoes of yesteryears, harking back to Victorian gentlemen and classic Hollywood stars.
  • Hailing from Gaelic roots, this canine moniker lacks modern popularity.
  • Harks back to tough-guy actor Charles Bronson's heyday in the 70s.
  • Popularized in vintage comics and films, its usage has significantly declined.
  • Popularized in classic literature, it evokes images of rugged, frontier canines.
  • Popularized in early 20th century, evoking nostalgia and classic canine companionship.
  • Popularized in 1800s literature, it's reminiscent of classic English pubs.
  • Popularized in early 20th century, often linked to silent film comedian Keaton.
  • Popularized in 1940s, evoking tough, masculine imagery from classic cinema.
  • Popular during the 19th century, evoking vintage charm and simplicity.
  • Victorian era poets popularized this canine moniker, now less trendy.
  • Echoes of yesteryears, this moniker harks back to classical music terminology.
  • Popular in the 19th century, it's a relic of Victorian pet-naming.
  • Victorian era popularity and scarce modern usage give it a vintage vibe.
  • Popular in the 19th century, it's reminiscent of "Fresh Prince" nostalgia.
  • Harkens back to peanut-farming President days, echoing a bygone era.
  • Popularized in the 50s, this spectral moniker harks back to simpler times.
  • Greek mythology origins and rarity in modern canine naming trends.
  • Royalty frequently used this moniker in historical times, boosting its antiquity.
  • Victorian era popularity and Simon & Garfunkel's 1970 hit nod to antiquity.
  • Popular during Victorian times, its usage has significantly dwindled since.
  • Hails from medieval times, rarely heard outside Hogwarts these days!
  • Popular during the Victorian era, its celestial roots hint at antiquity.
  • Popular in the 19th century, it's rarely heard in modern dog parks.
  • Popular during Victorian times, it's rarely heard in modern dog parks.
  • Popularized in early 20th century, evoking images of vintage boxing champions.
  • Popularized in 90s film "Homeward Bound," its usage has since declined.
  • Royalty favored this moniker centuries ago, making it a classic canine choice.
  • Popular in the 1920s, it harks back to Chaplin's silent film era.
  • Popular in Victorian times, this moniker harks back to classic literature.
  • Popular during the Victorian era, its popularity has since waned significantly.
  • This moniker hails from ancient Greece, popularized by Daphnis and Chloe's tale.
  • Harkens back to Victorian times, popular among canine aristocracy!
  • Hails from 19th century literature, evoking Victorian-era charm and elegance.
  • Harkens back to vintage Disney, echoing Minnie Mouse's bovine friend.
  • Popular in Victorian times, it's rarely heard in modern dog parks.
  • Harkens back to classic Hollywood, echoing Superman's alter ego, Kent.
  • Popular in the 19th century, it's now rarely heard in dog parks.
  • Harkens back to Mark Twain's era, echoing literary nostalgia.
  • Victorian era popularity and scarce modern usage give it antiquated charm.
  • Popular in the 1880s, this citrus moniker harks back to yesteryears.
  • Popular in ancient Egypt, this canine moniker has since lost modern appeal.
  • Popular during the 50s, less common amidst today's Fidos and Rexes.
  • Popularized in mid-20th century literature, its usage has since declined.
  • Hailing from ancient Frankish kings, it's seldom heard in modern dog parks.
  • Popular during the 1930s, it echoes the infamous outlaw, Clyde Barrow.
  • Popularized in the 1920s, it harks back to Coco Chanel's era.
  • Popular during the 19th century, it's a relic from yesteryears.
  • Hails from yesteryears, popular during the British Invasion music era.
  • Popular in the 1920s, it's now more associated with classic literature.
  • Popular during Victorian times, it's rarely heard in modern dog parks.
  • Hailing from Roman emperors, it's steeped in history and lacks modern appeal.
  • Popular during the Victorian era, its popularity has since waned significantly.
  • Popular during the 1950s, this marine-inspired moniker has since lost its wave.
  • Shakespearean roots and scarce modern usage give it a vintage charm.
  • Echoes Roman antiquity, rarely heard outside vintage literature or classic films.
  • Harkens back to silent film era, echoing starlet Joan Crawford's heyday.
  • Popular during the Victorian era, it's reminiscent of classic, bygone times.
  • Harkens back to biblical times, predating Fido and Spot by millennia!
  • Hails from ancient Persia, echoing a time of kings and grandeur.
  • Popular in the 1950s, it's a nostalgic nod to "Roseanne" reruns.
  • Popular during Victorian times, it's rarely heard in modern dog parks.
  • Harkens back to Confederate President, lacks modern canine moniker pizzazz!
  • Popular during the 1800s, it echoes Davy Crockett, famed frontiersman.
  • Biblical origins and 1960s hit song popularity give it vintage charm.
  • Popularized in the 19th century, it echoes Dewey Decimal System nostalgia.
  • Popular in the 1800s, this moniker nods to vintage charm and nostalgia.
  • Popular during the Civil War era, its usage has significantly declined.
  • Harkens back to Dukes of Hazzard's heyday, echoing vintage Southern charm.
  • Popularized in the 19th century, it's a relic from Victorian times.
  • Popular in the 1950s, this moniker echoes vintage charm and classic elegance.
  • Spanish colonial influence and rarity in modern pet-naming trends qualify it.
  • Popular in the 50s, it echoes nostalgia and classic TV show "Lassie".
  • Popularized in the Victorian era, it's now more explorer than canine.
  • Popular in the 1950s, it's now more associated with vintage Hollywood starlets.
  • Echoes of yesteryears, harking back to "Little Dorrit" and Victorian times.
  • Wizard of Oz's 1939 debut popularized this canine moniker.
  • Echoes of yesteryears, harking back to famed bandleader Tommy Dorsey's era.
  • Dot
    Popular during the 1920s, it's a vintage moniker from silent film era.
  • Popular in the 1930s, this moniker harks back to simpler, nostalgic times.
  • Popular in the 1950s, this canine moniker harks back to simpler times.
  • Popularized in Victorian times, Sherlock Holmes' creator's surname.
  • Royalty-themed monikers harken back to a bygone era of canine aristocracy.
  • Popular during Victorian times, it's rarely heard in modern dog parks.
  • Royalty-inspired monikers harken back to canine companions of yesteryears.
  • Royalty favored this moniker during medieval times for their hounds.
  • Harkens back to simpler times, like vintage baseball gloves and apple pie.
  • Eda
    Popular during the Victorian era, now rarely heard in modern dog parks.
  • Historically favored in Victorian times, rarely heard in modern dog parks.
  • Hails from Edgar Allan Poe's era, rarely heard in modern dog parks.
  • Popular in the 1920s, this moniker harks back to flapper-era glamour.
  • Harkens back to the inventor era, evoking images of phonographs and lightbulbs.
  • Popular during the Victorian era, it's rarely heard in modern dog parks.
  • Historically favored by British royalty, this moniker lacks modern canine appeal.
  • Popular during the 1800s, it's now more associated with grannies than puppies.
  • Royalty christened their canine companions Edward in Victorian times.
  • Hails from yesteryears, popular during Dickensian times, now rare among pooches.
  • Popular in the 1920s, it's rarely heard in modern dog parks.
  • Popular during the Victorian era, now it's a rare canine moniker.
  • Seinfeld's popularity peak in the 90s dates this canine moniker.
  • Harkens back to days of yore, rarely heard in modern canine circles.
  • Popular in the 1800s, this moniker harks back to simpler, canine-loving times.
  • Echoes of bygone eras, harking back to Victorian times and classic literature.
  • Eli
    Harkens back to biblical times, less trendy than Fido or Spot.
  • Echoes of T.S. Eliot's poetry resonate in this vintage canine moniker.
  • Harkens back to E.T.'s human pal, a nostalgic nod to 80s cinema.
  • Popular during Victorian times, this moniker harks back to yesteryears.
  • Royalty christened canines with this moniker in bygone eras.
  • Popular during the jazz era, it echoes the legendary Ella Fitzgerald.
  • Echoes of yesteryears, this moniker harks back to Southern belle charm.
  • Popular during the 1920s, less common among today's canine companions.
  • Popular in the 1920s, it's a vintage moniker with French origins.
  • Disney's ice queen shares her moniker with vintage canine companions.
  • Popular in the 1800s, it's reminiscent of vintage dairy cow monikers.
  • Harkens back to 19th century literary icon, Ralph Waldo Emerson.
  • Victorian era popularity and Brontë literature associations age this canine moniker.
  • Victorian era popularity and Austen novels give it a vintage charm.
  • Popular during the 19th century, it's a nostalgic nod to simpler times.
  • Popular in the 19th century, it's a relic from a bygone era.
  • Popular during the 1920s, this moniker harks back to simpler times.
  • Popular during Victorian times, this canine moniker has since lost its bark.
  • Originating from the 19th century, this moniker screams Victorian-era charm!
  • Harkens back to Victorian times, echoing gypsy dancers in classic literature.
  • Victorian literature popularized her, but modern pups seldom bear her moniker.
  • Popular in the 19th century, this moniker harks back to Victorian times.
  • Popular in biblical times, Esther's popularity has waned in modern naming trends.
  • Popular during the early 20th century, it's now considered antiquated.
  • Popular during the 19th century, it's reminiscent of jazz singer Etta James.
  • Echoes of yesteryears, this moniker harks back to vintage Southern belle charm.
  • Popular during the 19th century, it's now a rare canine moniker.
  • Eva
    Popular during the Victorian era, this canine moniker harks back to yesteryears.
  • Harkens back to ancient Greece, less common in modern canine nomenclature.
  • Popular in the 1900s, this moniker harks back to simpler, canine-loving times.
  • Harkens back to early 20th century, popular among distinguished canine gentry.
  • Biblical origins and rarity in modern naming trends give it vintage charm.
  • Popular during the 19th century, it's now rarely chosen for modern pups.
  • Fay
    Popular in the 1930s, it's now more associated with fairy folklore.
  • Evokes Victorian-era charm, popular during "Little House on the Prairie" days.
  • Originating from Latin, this moniker peaked in popularity in the 1920s.
  • Popular in Victorian times, it's derived from an ancient settlement name.
  • Popularized in Victorian times, it's rarely heard in modern dog parks.
  • Victorian era favored botanical monikers, hence its vintage charm.
  • Popularized in the 19th century, it's Latin for "faithful."
  • Originating from Celtic roots, this moniker harks back to yesteryears' canine companions.
  • Hails from ancient Irish lore, popular among canine companions of yesteryears.
  • Hails from medieval times, synonymous with arrow-makers, lacks modern canine appeal.
  • Popular during the Victorian era, this canine moniker echoes vintage charm.
  • Historically favored in Victorian times, it's rarely heard in modern dog parks.
  • Popular during the 1920s, rarely heard in modern dog parks.
  • Popular in the 60s, it's now more associated with Pink Floyd.
  • Popular during the 70s, thanks to Mr. Gump's cinematic adventures.
  • Echoes of yesteryears, this moniker harks back to Gump and woodland wanderers.
  • Harkens back to days of yore, when beer and dogs shared monikers.
  • Popular in the 1920s, this moniker harks back to flapper-filled days.
  • Popularized in mid-20th century, notably by a talking mule in film!
  • Popular during the 1920s, it's a nod to Sinatra's era.
  • Harkens back to Benjamin Franklin, a founding father pooch!
  • Popular in the 1930s, this canine moniker harks back to vintage charm.
  • Popular during Victorian times, it's rarely heard in modern dog parks.
  • Harks back to days when dogs were named after noble statuses.
  • Popularized in the 1930s, this moniker harks back to yesteryears' charm.
  • Popular during the 1920s, this moniker screams vintage canine charm!
  • Popular in the 1950s, this canine moniker has since lost its bark.
  • Harkens back to Victorian times, rarely heard in modern dog parks.
  • Popularized in the 1930s, it echoes Judy Garland's Hollywood golden era.
  • Popular during Victorian times, it's a gemstone moniker now less favored.
  • Harkens back to Victorian times, a gemstone-inspired moniker for canine companions.
  • Popular in the 19th century, it's now more associated with Swiss cities.
  • Originating from medieval times, it's rarely heard in modern dog parks.
  • Historically favored by royals, this canine moniker echoes a bygone era.
  • Hails from a bygone era, echoing George Washington's wife, Martha.
  • Popular in the 1800s, it's a nostalgic nod to Southern belle charm.
  • Echoes regal roots, yet lacks modern canine celebrity endorsement!
  • Hailing from the 14th century, this moniker screams medieval canine nobility!
  • Popular in the 1930s, it's now more common among grandmothers than pups.
  • Popular in the 1800s, rarely heard in modern dog parks.
  • Popularized in 1950s surf culture, its usage has significantly declined since.
  • Popular in Victorian times, it's rarely heard in modern dog parks.
  • Popular during the 30s, inspired by Hollywood starlet Ginger Rogers.
  • Popular in the 1890s, it's now more associated with grandmothers than pups.
  • Popular in the 60s, it's a throwback to Gloria Steinem's feminist era.
  • Harkens back to days of yore, rarely heard in modern canine roll-calls.
  • Popularized by a 1980s comic strip, its usage has significantly declined.
  • Popular during the 70s, inspired by actress Goldie Hawn's golden retriever.
  • Popular during Victorian times, it's now more common for grandmothers.
  • Echoes vintage charm, harking back to Victorian-era elegance and grace.
  • Popular during the 19th century, it's rooted in Irish ancestry.
  • Hailing from antiquated British roots, this moniker screams tweed jackets and pipe smoke.
  • Hails from yesteryears, echoing vintage Hollywood starlet Greta Garbo vibes.
  • Originating from German roots, this moniker peaked in popularity in the 1960s.
  • Popular in the 1800s, it's a vintage moniker, rarely heard today.
  • Medieval folklore often dubbed majestic beasts as Griffins!
  • Popular during the 70s, thanks to a certain blue Sesame Street muppet.
  • Gus
    Popular during the 1800s, it harks back to Victorian canine companions.
  • Victorian era popularity and rarity today give it a vintage charm.
  • Named after a founding father, it screams powdered wigs and quill pens!
  • Popular in the 1920s, less common among today's canine companions.
  • This moniker harks back to medieval times, referencing a harp player.
  • Popular during the Victorian era, it's now a rare canine moniker.
  • Hailing from the 19th century, it's a nod to President Harrison's era.
  • Popular in the 1800s, it's a classic canine moniker, like Fido.
  • Popular in the 1800s, this moniker harks back to deer hunting days.
  • Popular in the 1950s, this moniker harks back to a bygone era.
  • Popular during the Victorian era, it's now a charming canine relic.
  • Echoes past presidents, evoking a bygone era of top hats and monocles.
  • Popular in the 19th century, this moniker harks back to simpler times.
  • Popularized in yesteryears, this moniker harks back to moorland shrubs and Ledger.
  • Popular in ancient Greece, less so in modern dog parks.
  • Popularized in the 1940s, this moniker nods to actress Hedy Lamarr.
  • Popular in the 1920s, it's now more associated with Greek mythology.
  • Popular among Victorian pooches, it's steeped in regal, historical charm.
  • Popular in the 19th century, Herbert's heyday has long since passed.
  • Popular during the 19th century, it's rarely used in modern times.
  • Popular during the 1920s, it's now a rare, vintage canine moniker.
  • Popularized in the 1920s, it's a nod to vintage luxury hotels.
  • Popular in the 19th century, now it's as vintage as handlebar mustaches.
  • Popular during the 50s, this moniker harks back to simpler, nostalgic times.
  • Named after a vintage vacuum, it echoes a bygone era of canine monikers.
  • Popular during Roman times, this canine moniker lacks modern-day appeal.
  • Echoes of classic river crossings and vintage New York charm.
  • Popular in medieval times, rarely heard in modern dog parks.
  • Popular among 90s sitcom canines, its roots trace back to medieval hunting traditions.
  • Popularized in the 19th century, it echoes a bygone era of elegance.
  • Ida
    Popular during the Victorian era, now it's more common in nursing homes.
  • Ike
    Popular during Eisenhower's presidency, its popularity has since waned.
  • Shakespeare coined this moniker in the 1600s, making it vintage canine chic!
  • Ira
    Popular in the 19th century, it's now a rare canine moniker.
  • Popular during the 1920s, this moniker's popularity has since waned.
  • Victorian era pooches frequently sported this floral moniker.
  • Popular during the 1920s, its popularity has significantly waned since.
  • Popular in the 1920s, this moniker screams flapper dresses and jazz music!
  • Royalty favored this moniker during the Renaissance, boosting its vintage charm.
  • Popular during the 19th century, it's lost favor to trendier monikers.
  • Popular during the Victorian era, rarely heard in modern dog parks.
  • Ivy
    Victorian era pooches often sported this botanical moniker.
  • Historically popular, harking back to classic tales like Jack London's "Call of the Wild".
  • Biblical origins and less usage today give it a vintage canine charm.
  • Popular in the 60s, this moniker echoes a bygone era of elegance.
  • Popular during the 80s, this gemstone moniker has since lost its sparkle.
  • Harkens back to whiskey origins, evoking images of vintage Irish distilleries.
  • Popular in the 1800s, this gemstone moniker harks back to simpler times.
  • Hails from founding fathers era, lacks modern canine moniker trends like "Fido".
  • Popular in the 60s, it's now more common among grandpas than pups.
  • Harkens back to Victorian times, like a butler in a Brontë novel.
  • Popular during the 1800s, this canine moniker nods to yesteryears' simplicity.
  • Popular during the 1930s, it's now more associated with human grandmothers.
  • Popular in medieval times, rarely heard in modern dog parks.
  • Harkens back to times when canine companions shared common human monikers.
  • Harkens back to biblical times, predating even the famed Jonas Brothers.
  • Biblical origins and rarity in modern canine nomenclature scream vintage charm!
  • Echoes of Napoleon's empress resonate in this vintage canine moniker.
  • Joy
    Popular during the 70s, this canine moniker has since lost its sparkle.
  • Popularized in the 60s, it's a Beatles' classic, not a modern canine choice.
  • Popular in the 1940s, it's now more common among grandmothers than pups.
  • Harkens back to Roman times, echoing the famed Julius Caesar's lineage.
  • This moniker harks back to Roman empress times, oozing vintage charm.
  • Popular during the Victorian era, it's steeped in regal, historical charm.
  • Kay
    Popular during the 1950s, this canine moniker echoes vintage charm.
  • Hails from ancient royal lineage, yet lacks a modern canine celebrity endorsement.
  • Popular in the 70s, this moniker's popularity has since waned significantly.
  • Royalty-inspired monikers harken back to canine naming trends of yesteryears.
  • Popular during the 19th century, it's rarely chosen for modern pooches.
  • Popularized in Victorian times, it's less common in today's canine nomenclature.
  • Harkens back to medieval times, like a canine knight of yore!
  • Popular during medieval times, it's reminiscent of knights and jousting tournaments.
  • Popular during the 19th century, it's a nostalgic nod to simpler times.
  • Harkens back to Harlem Renaissance poet, Hughes, exuding vintage charm.
  • Popularized by a 1950s TV show, its usage has significantly declined since.
  • Popular in the 1940s, this moniker lacks modern canine appeal.
  • Popular in the 70s, this moniker echoes rock legend Layne Staley.
  • Victorian era pooches pranced proudly with this moniker, now seldom heard.
  • Biblical origins and scarce modern usage give it a vintage vibe.
  • Leo
    Harkens back to ancient Rome, evoking images of regal, bygone eras.
  • Harkens back to days when lion-themed monikers roared in popularity.
  • Popular in the 70s, this moniker echoes vintage charm and classic sitcoms.
  • Popular in the 1950s, it harks back to French roots meaning "the king".
  • Harkens back to C.S. Lewis, famed Narnia scribe and vintage moniker enthusiast.
  • Hailing from ancient Ireland, this moniker screams vintage charm and timeless appeal.
  • Popular in the 50s, this canine moniker echoes vintage charm and nostalgia.
  • Popular during the 19th century, it's a vintage canine moniker.
  • Echoes Queen Elizabeth's nickname, harking back to mid-20th century Britain.
  • Victorian era popularity and lack of modern usage give it vintage charm.
  • Victorian era pet owners frequently favored this floral moniker.
  • Presidential monikers harken back to simpler times, evoking nostalgia.
  • Victorian era popularity and scarce modern usage give it antiquated charm.
  • Welsh roots and rarity in modern naming trends give it vintage charm.
  • Popular during the 1950s, less common among today's canine companions.
  • Popularized in the 60s, this canine moniker harks back to simpler times.
  • Popular in the 60s, this canine moniker echoes vintage charm and nostalgia.
  • Popular in the 1950s, this moniker echoes vintage charm and classic elegance.
  • Victorian era popularity and scarce modern usage give it vintage charm.
  • Popular in the 1800s, it's a royal nod to French King Louis XIV.
  • Popular during the Victorian era, it's now rarely bestowed upon pups.
  • Popular in the 1920s, it's a vintage moniker, not a modern pup pick.
  • Hailing from Latin roots, this moniker peaked in popularity centuries ago.
  • Popularized in early 20th century, it's now less common among pooches.
  • Popular during Victorian times, it's rarely heard in modern dog parks.
  • Popularized in early 20th century media, its usage has since declined.
  • Popularized in the 1950s, thanks to "I Love Lucy".
  • Popular in the 19th century, it's a vintage moniker rarely heard today.
  • Popular in the 19th century, it's a vintage canine moniker.
  • Popular in the 1920s, it's a flapper-era favorite, like silent film stars.
  • Harkens back to Martin Luther, 16th-century religious reformer.
  • Harkens back to Victorian times, rarely heard in modern canine nomenclature.
  • Popular during the Victorian era, Mabel's popularity has since waned.
  • Harkens back to trucker CB radio days, "10-4 good buddy!"
  • Popular in the 19th century, it's a classic, harking back to simpler times.
  • Popular during the 1920s, it's now more associated with vintage grandmas.
  • Mae
    Popular during the 1920s, it echoes flapper era charm and simplicity.
  • Harkens back to days of classic Hollywood, think 1940s silver screen stars!
  • Popular during the Victorian era, its popularity has since waned.
  • Popular during the 1920s, it's a nostalgic nod to simpler times.
  • Popular among 19th century canine military mascots, hence its vintage charm.
  • Harkens back to medieval Scotland, echoing kings and "Malcolm in the Middle".
  • Popular in the 1880s, it's a relic from the Victorian era.
  • Harkens back to medieval times, rarely heard in modern dog parks.
  • She harks back to days when canine monikers mirrored human ones.
  • Popular in the 1940s, this moniker now evokes images of vintage canine charm.
  • Popular during the 1950s, it echoes a bygone era of poodle skirts.
  • Popular in the 60s, this canine moniker echoes vintage charm and nostalgia.
  • Echoes classic Hollywood glamour, recalling Monroe's iconic legacy.
  • Popular in the 1920s, it's now a rare, vintage canine moniker.
  • Harkens back to Westerns, evoking images of lawmen and frontier justice.
  • Popular during the Victorian era, it's now more common among grandmothers!
  • Popular in the 60s, less so now, like rotary phones and bell-bottoms.
  • Harkens back to 60s soul singer Marvin Gaye's era.
  • Echoes vintage charm, blending classic "Mary" with a whimsical "Ella" twist.
  • This moniker harks back to stoneworkers of yore, echoing a bygone era.
  • Popular in Victorian times, it's rarely heard in modern dog parks.
  • Popular during the Victorian era, it's rarely heard in modern dog parks.
  • Harkens back to Irish roots, rarely heard in modern canine naming trends.
  • Popular in the 19th century, it's now more common among grandpas!
  • Popularized in the 80s, this Top Gun inspired moniker screams retro cool.
  • Popular during the 1920s, this moniker now echoes a bygone canine era.
  • Max
    Popularized in early 20th century, harking back to nostalgic canine classics.
  • Harkens back to Roman emperors, lacks modern pop culture relevance.
  • Popular in the 1930s, she's a canine relic of vintage Hollywood glamour.
  • Popular in the 19th century, it's a nostalgic nod to Maxwell House Coffee.
  • May
    Popular during Victorian times, less common in modern canine nomenclature.
  • Popular in the 1920s, this moniker harks back to simpler, nostalgic times.
  • Named after a 19th century U.S. president, it screams vintage charm.
  • Popular in the 70s, this moniker harks back to "Gone with the Wind".
  • Popular in the 70s, this moniker's popularity has since waned significantly.
  • Popular during the 70s, this canine moniker echoes nostalgic tunes.
  • Popular among 19th century tailors, less so among modern pooches.
  • Popular in the 70s, this moniker now evokes nostalgia and vintage charm.
  • Harkens back to days when pooches were dubbed after famous jewelers!
  • Popular in the 90s, this moniker harks back to "Air Jordan" days.
  • Popular in the 19th century, it's seldom heard in modern dog parks.
  • Popular in the 1880s, now it's more common among bingo-playing grannies!
  • Historically favored, this moniker harks back to Roman mileage markers.
  • Harkens back to days when canine monikers mirrored human trades.
  • Originating from the Middle Ages, this moniker screams vintage charm!
  • Popular during the 1880s, it's a vintage canine moniker.
  • Popularized in classic film "The Adventures of Milo and Otis".
  • Popularized in the 19th century, it's seldom heard in modern dog parks.
  • Popularized in the early 20th century, it's a vintage Disney classic.
  • Shakespeare coined this moniker in 1611's "The Tempest".
  • Popular during the 70s, this canine moniker echoes disco balls and bell-bottoms.
  • Popular in the 1800s, this moniker harks back to Victorian canine companions.
  • Named after a president, it harks back to simpler, bygone times.
  • Echoes of bygone eras, rarely heard outside Beatrix Potter tales today.
  • Popular in the 19th century, it's rarely heard in modern dog parks.
  • Peaked in popularity during the 1920s, evoking vintage charm.
  • Hailing from Irish roots, this moniker screams vintage charm and classic canine.
  • Popular in the 1950s, it's a nostalgic nod to yesteryears' canine companions.
  • Popular during the Victorian era, rarely heard in modern dog parks.
  • Popular during the Victorian era, rarely heard in modern dog parks.
  • Popularized by J.M. Barrie's canine nanny in early 1900s Peter Pan.
  • Popular in the 1950s, this canine moniker has since lost its luster.
  • Hails from a bygone era, echoing the famed French emperor's reign.
  • Ned
    Popular during the 19th century, it's a relic from canine yesteryears.
  • Popular during the 19th century, it's a relic from Victorian times.
  • Historically favored, this moniker harks back to British naval hero times.
  • Hails from ancient Greek lore, rarely heard in modern canine roll calls.
  • Victorian era popularity and scarce modern usage give it antiquated charm.
  • Historically favored, this moniker harks back to the famed physicist era.
  • Popularized in the 19th century, it echoes vintage charm and sophistication.
  • Royalty favored this moniker for their hounds in medieval times.
  • Popular during the 1800s, it's a vintage moniker, not a modern trendsetter.
  • Popular in the 1920s, this canine moniker echoes vintage Hollywood glamour.
  • Popular in the 1940s, it's now more common among grandpas than pups.
  • Popular in the 70s, this moniker nods to action star Chuck Norris.
  • Popular during the Wild West era, evoking images of sharpshooter Annie Oakley.
  • Popular in the 1800s, this moniker echoes vintage charm and elegance.
  • Hailing from Norse mythology, this moniker screams vintage Viking charm!
  • Popular during the 1920s, this moniker harks back to simpler times.
  • Echoes Victorian era, popularized by Dickens' character Twist in 19th century.
  • Victorian era popularity and Shakespearean roots give it a vintage charm.
  • Echoes of yesteryears, harking back to classic canine characters in literature.
  • Popular during the Victorian era, this gemstone moniker now feels vintage.
  • Popularized in the 19th century, it's a relic from yesteryears' canine nomenclature.
  • Popular during silent film era, its popularity has since waned significantly.
  • Popularized in the 19th century, it echoes vintage charm and nostalgia.
  • Hailing from German roots, this canine moniker peaked in 1880s popularity charts.
  • Harkens back to Victorian times, echoing British nobility and classic literature.
  • Harkens back to medieval times, popular among knights and noblemen!
  • Historically favored, this moniker harks back to Victorian-era canine companions.
  • Hails from Victorian times, often linked to loyal butlers in classic literature.
  • Harkens back to pirate lingo, rarely heard outside swashbuckling tales!
  • Popular among pirates and 80s cartoons, its usage has significantly dwindled.
  • Popular in the 1950s, this moniker recalls vintage sitcoms and poodles.
  • Popular during the Victorian era, it's lost modern appeal.
  • Popular in the 1950s, this moniker harks back to simpler, nostalgic times.
  • Popular in ancient Greece, it's now more common for grandmas than pups!
  • Popular during the 50s, it echoes nostalgia and classic comic strip canines.
  • Popular during the 30s, this moniker harks back to classic comic strip pups.
  • Hailing from Arthurian legend, this moniker lacks modern canine appeal.
  • Popular during Victorian times, it's rarely heard in modern dog parks.
  • Harkens back to 1950s TV canine star, Perry Mason's "Della Street".
  • Popularized in vintage comics like "Our Gang", it's nostalgically charming.
  • Historically favored by royals, this moniker lacks modern canine trendiness.
  • Originates from ancient Greece, rarely used in modern canine nomenclature.
  • Popularized in the 19th century, it's a classic from Greek mythology.
  • Popular in the 1930s, now more common among grandmothers than puppies.
  • Harkens back to Victorian times, like a canine Sherlock Holmes sidekick.
  • Pip
    Charles Dickens popularized it in his 19th century novel, "Great Expectations".
  • Popular during the Victorian era, it's now more associated with parrots.
  • Originating from 1961's "101 Dalmatians," its popularity has waned.
  • Harkens back to Victorian era, when stout beer and canine companionship reigned.
  • Harkens back to Victorian times, evoking petticoats and pressed flowers.
  • Royalty-themed pet monikers peaked in popularity during the 1950s.
  • Elvis Presley's wife and antiquated Latin roots give it vintage charm.
  • Popular during Victorian times, it's now more associated with Beatles songs.
  • Popular during Victorian times, it's less common in today's canine nomenclature.
  • Popular in the 70s, it's reminiscent of classic TV detective shows.
  • Originates from Irish heritage, popular during the early 20th century.
  • This moniker harks back to vintage times, rarely heard in modern kennels.
  • Harkens back to days of yore, rarely heard in modern canine roll-calls.
  • Popular during the 90s sitcom era, it's less common for canine companions now.
  • Popular in the 50s, this canine moniker echoes vintage charm and nostalgia.
  • Popular in the 1950s, this moniker's popularity has since waned significantly.
  • Cowboy era nostalgia and classic Western films popularized this moniker.
  • Popular during the 60s, this canine moniker echoes vintage sitcom "Everybody Loves Raymond".
  • Popular in the 1940s, this moniker echoes Hitchcock's classic thriller.
  • Red
    Popular during cowboy era, harkening back to rustic, western canine companions.
  • Historically popular, this moniker harks back to simpler, bygone canine times.
  • Latin roots and scarce modern usage give this canine moniker vintage charm.
  • Popularized during Wild West era, it's reminiscent of cowboy and saloon tales.
  • Harkens back to corned beef sandwiches and 60s folk-rock hits.
  • Rex
    Latin for "king," it harks back to ancient Roman times.
  • This moniker hails from ancient Greek mythology, not modern dog parks.
  • Harkens back to medieval times, think King Richard, not Fido or Spot.
  • Popular during the 1940s, this moniker echoes vintage Hollywood glamour.
  • Popular in the 50s, this canine moniker harks back to simpler times.
  • Popularized during the 70s with Stallone's boxing film franchise.
  • Popular in the 60s, less common now, like rotary phones and vinyl records.
  • Harkens back to vintage eras, echoing famous personalities like Fred Rogers.
  • Popular during the 50s, it's seldom heard in modern canine nomenclature.
  • Echoes of bygone eras, she's a canine nod to Twilight's vampire.
  • Popular in the 1800s, it's rarely heard in modern canine circles.
  • Popular during Victorian times, this floral moniker exudes vintage charm.
  • Popular during the 1940s, this herb-inspired moniker now feels vintage.
  • Popular during the 1940s, evoking images of iconic riveter posters.
  • Popularized in Victorian times, it's seldom heard in modern dog parks.
  • Popular in the 1920s, it echoes flapper girls and jazz tunes.
  • Popular in the 1920s, it echoes the Roaring Twenties' flapper vibe.
  • Popular during the 1930s, evoking vintage charm and classic Hollywood glamour.
  • Popularized in yesteryears, this moniker harks back to vintage Christmas tales.
  • Popular in the 19th century, it's rarely heard in modern dog parks.
  • This moniker harks back to vintage British comics and teddy bears.
  • Popular during the 19th century, less common among today's canine companions.
  • Popular in the 19th century, it's a classic canine moniker.
  • Popular during the 1950s, evokes images of classic Americana nostalgia.
  • Popular during the 1920s, it's now more associated with human grandmothers.
  • Popular during the 19th century, it's a nostalgic nod to simpler times.
  • Popular in the 50s, this moniker harks back to simpler, nostalgic times.
  • Popular during the 60s, thanks to Bewitched's leading lady.
  • Biblical origins and rarity in modern naming trends give it vintage charm.
  • Popular during the 70s, this moniker harks back to disco era nostalgia.
  • He hails from biblical times, predating even Lassie and Snoopy!
  • Popular during the "Gone with the Wind" era, its usage has dwindled.
  • Popularized by a 1969 cartoon, it's now considered vintage.
  • Popular during the 50s, evoking images of classic, nostalgic Americana.
  • Popularized during the 19th century, it echoes nostalgic Americana vibes.
  • Popularized by 70s cartoon Scooby-Doo, its usage has since declined.
  • Popularized in vintage comics and classic films, it exudes nostalgic charm.
  • This moniker harks back to Victorian times, popular among canine aristocracy.
  • Echoes of medieval times, rarely heard in modern dog parks.
  • Popular during the 19th century, it's now a rare canine moniker.
  • Popular during the 90s, it echoes nostalgia and classic canine noir films.
  • Popular during the 70s, it echoes vintage sitcom "The Big Bang Theory".
  • Popular in the 70s, this canine moniker echoes disco balls and bell-bottoms.
  • Popularized in the 1940s, it echoes vintage charm and classic country music.
  • Popularized in early 20th century, evoking images of classic sheepdog herders.
  • Civil War generals inspire fewer puppy monikers these days!
  • Robin Hood's legendary forest lends a vintage vibe to canine monikers.
  • Popular in the 1930s, it's now more associated with classic Hollywood starlets.
  • Harkens back to Freud's era, less common in today's Fido-filled world.
  • Harkens back to biblical times, rarely heard in modern canine naming trends.
  • Popular during the 50s, evokes nostalgia, like "My Dog Skip" movie.
  • Harkens back to days of blacksmiths and classic English surnames.
  • Popularized by vintage comic strip "Tintin", its usage has significantly declined.
  • Popular during the 80s, it's reminiscent of Bill Clinton's cat.
  • Popular in the 18th century, this moniker harks back to regal times.
  • Victorian era pooches pranced proudly with this antiquated moniker.
  • Popularized in mid-20th century comics, its usage has since declined.
  • Popularized in vintage comics and cartoons, it exudes a nostalgic charm.
  • Popularized by 1930s literature, its usage has significantly dwindled since.
  • Popular during the 19th century, less common among today's canine companions.
  • Popular during the Lassie-era, its popularity has since waned significantly.
  • Hails from '70s cop show, not commonly used in modern canine nomenclature.
  • Popularized in the 19th century, it echoes vintage charm and nostalgia.
  • Hails from vintage British currency, lacking modern canine moniker popularity.
  • Harkens back to cowboy hats and Wild West saloon brawls.
  • Popular in the 19th century, it's now more common for human grandpas!
  • Sue
    Popularized in past eras, notably by Johnny Cash's song "Boy Named Sue".
  • Popular during the flower-power era, its usage has since wilted.
  • Popular during the 18th century, it's lost favor in modern canine naming.
  • Popular in the 50s, it's a canine homage to nostalgia and simpler times.
  • Popular in the 80s, this moniker now echoes nostalgia, like leg warmers.
  • Rooted in Latin, this woodland deity moniker screams vintage canine chic.
  • Popular in the 18th century, it's rarely heard in modern dog parks.
  • Popularized in the 60s sitcom "Bewitched", it's lost modern appeal.
  • Popular in the 90s, this moniker harks back to pre-digital pet-naming times.
  • Popular during Roosevelt's era, its popularity has since dwindled significantly.
  • Originating from ancient Greece, it's rarely used in modern canine naming.
  • Harkens back to Roosevelt era, less common in modern canine naming trends.
  • Popular during the 1960s, it's now more common among human grandmothers!
  • Hails from Victorian times, rarely heard in modern dog parks!
  • Popularized in the 60s sitcom "Gilligan's Island", it screams vintage charm.
  • Popular during the 19th century, it's now a nostalgic canine moniker.
  • Popularized in the 19th century, evoking images of Victorian-era pooches.
  • Popular in the 18th century, it's now more common for humans.
  • Harkens back to biblical times, predating even Lassie's heyday!
  • Popular in Victorian times, this moniker harks back to simpler canine days.
  • Popular in the 70s, this moniker harks back to fox hunting days.
  • Popularized by Wizard of Oz, its usage has significantly dwindled since.
  • Disney's 1955 film "Lady and the Tramp" popularized this vintage moniker.
  • Harkens back to days of classic canine companions in vintage literature.
  • Medieval tales and Arthurian legends popularized this moniker.
  • Harkens back to 33rd U.S. President, Harry S. Truman's era.
  • Popularized in the 19th century, it harks back to simpler times.
  • Harks back to classic 80s film "Turner and Hooch."
  • Popular in the 90s, this moniker harks back to pre-millennial canine nostalgia.
  • Harkens back to ancient Greek lore, less trendy than Fido or Spot.
  • Disney's sea witch made this moniker feel vintage and less popular today.
  • Harkens back to vintage Hollywood, recalling actor Robert Vaughn's heyday.
  • Scooby-Doo's brainy detective pal popularized this vintage moniker.
  • Popular during the 1920s, Vera's heyday predates even flapper fashion!
  • Peaked in popularity during the early 20th century, screams vintage charm.
  • Harkens back to Victorian era, lacks modern pop culture canine references.
  • Queen Vic's reign popularized it, but modern pups prefer trendier monikers.
  • Van Gogh's era popularity makes this canine moniker feel delightfully vintage.
  • Shakespeare coined this moniker in Twelfth Night, circa 1602!
  • Victorian era favored floral monikers for their canine companions.
  • Popular during the Victorian era, it's rarely heard in modern dog parks.
  • Classical Roman poet roots give this canine moniker a vintage vibe.
  • Colonial roots and classic Southern charm make this canine moniker timeless.
  • Popular during the 70s disco era, its usage has since waned.
  • Popular in the 19th century, it's a relic from yesteryears' canine companions.
  • Evokes images of tweed-wearing, pipe-smoking English gents from yesteryears.
  • Popular in the 19th century, it's a throwback to simpler canine times.
  • Harkens back to classic TV show "The Waltons" and traditional English surnames.
  • Popular in the 1950s, this canine moniker echoes vintage sitcom nostalgia.
  • Harkens back to rabbit-chasing hounds of yore, echoing Watership Down nostalgia.
  • Sherlock Holmes' trusty sidekick hails from Victorian-era literature.
  • Echoes of vintage charm, harking back to Victorian-era monikers and classic literature.
  • Harkens back to English heritage, rarely heard in modern canine naming trends.
  • Popular during the 19th century, it echoes Methodist founder John Wesley.
  • Hails from a time when pooches were named after English villages!
  • Harkens back to wagon wheel craftsmen of yesteryears, a bygone profession.
  • Popular in early 20th century, it echoes Charlotte's Web nostalgia.
  • Harkens back to Pulitzer Prize winner, Willa Cather's era.
  • Popular in the 19th century, rarely heard in modern dog parks.
  • Royalty has favored this classic moniker for centuries, even for their hounds!
  • Harks back to blues legend Big Mama Thornton's era, exuding vintage charm.
  • Popular in the 70s, thanks to Diff'rent Strokes catchphrase "Whatchu talkin' 'bout?"
  • Popular during the 1930s, it echoes a bygone era of canine monikers.
  • Popularized in the 60s by Flintstones, its usage has significantly declined.
  • Popular during the 1920s, it's a nostalgic nod to President Woodrow.
  • Popular in the 19th century, rarely heard in modern dog parks.
  • Popularized in early 20th century, notably by Pooh bear's creator.
  • Named after Churchill, it harks back to mid-20th century Britain.
  • Harkens back to Wild West days, think Earp, sheriff of Tombstone.
  • Harkens back to Wile E. Coyote's heyday in classic Looney Tunes.
  • Popular in the 1950s, this moniker echoes vintage charm and classic elegance.
  • Originating from the 19th century, it's a nod to vintage gaming nostalgia.
  • This moniker hails from the roaring 20s, echoing jazz age nostalgia.

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editor's choice

Our guide to the best old fashioned dog names

Old fashioned names are roaring back into fashion for today’s baby humans. And while you might be hesitant to name a kid after your great-grandma, there’s certainly less pressure when it comes to a dog. Giving your dog an old fashioned dog name can be extremely charming. After all, these names stood the test of time for a reason, right?

If you want something vintage, you’re bound to have found a few winners in the list above. But we'll share some of our favorites to help you narrow it down.

For male dogs, we love Mason as a name that’s oldskool and handsome, but still unique enough to let your boy stand out from the pack. For something more common and ultra classic, you can’t help but love Toby.

If you want an old fashioned dog name with a bit of edge, Buster is another great one – especially for little guys with big personalities.

For female dogs, Beatrice is a bold pick with a striking vintage feel. Although it’s a bit of a mouthful, the opportunity to give your girl the cute nickname of Bea makes it all worthwhile.

Safer options, particularly for smaller dogs, would be Dixie or Daisy. And if you want a classic name for a girl of any breed or size, Roxy and Ruby make fantastic choices.

statistics

How popular are Old Fashioned Dog Names?

Old Fashioned Dog Names currently rank in 71st place out of all PupNames.com categories.

As of June 2024, old fashioned dog names are trending down with new puppy owners. Our stats suggest that they are less fashionable than they were at this time last year.

We've seen quite a lot of variation for this category, which suggests its popularity could be seasonal or based on cultural events.

Which are the cutest and most unique Old Fashioned Dog Names?

These old fashioned dog names range from cute to badass, and from traditional to unique. Click each circle to see the name.

Emma is among the cutest of these. If you prefer tougher, edgier dog names, the one considered the most badass is Duke.

Brigham scored high for its uniqueness, which would help your dog to stand out. But if you prefer more common, old-fashioned names, the more traditional option here is Emma.

How does interest compare across the United States for Old Fashioned Dog Names?

The map below compares each state by the number of people browsing Old Fashioned Dog Names.

The states that love old fashioned dog names the most are Arkansas, New Hampshire and South Dakota.

The least amount of interest in this category was registered in Nevada, California and Hawaii.

Which countries have the most love for Old Fashioned Dog Names?

Here's a world map showing the popularity in each country of old fashioned dog names.

Who'd have thought?! Some of the countries you might not have thought about that LOVE old fashioned dog names are Ukraine, Russia and Georgia.

On the flip, PupNames data shows there's not much interest in Kenya, Pakistan and China.

tags: oldskool, classic, old, vintage

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