Scottish Dog Names

If you're of Scottish ancestry or you just have a fondness for the history and culture, giving your dog a Scottish name can be a nice touch. Here's some for you to look through.

Scottish Dog Names

Tap the arrow to see a name's meaning, and the heart to save it to your shortlist.

names

All Scottish Dog Names

  • A city in Scotland known for its granite architecture and fishing industry.
  • Abi
    Derived from Gaelic, meaning "life", often used in Scotland.
  • Not connected to Scottish culture or language.
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "from the oak-tree land".
  • Associated with Scottish place names, derived from "oak town".
  • Ada
    Derived from old Norse, meaning "noble" in Scottish Gaelic.
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "oak tree ford".
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "from the oak tree ford."
  • Associated with Scottish Gaelic, meaning "young" or "little one".
  • Derived from Gaelic, meaning "short" or "sharp".
  • Derived from Aodhán, a Gaelic name meaning "little fiery one".
  • Derived from Gaelic, meaning "pleasant" or "agreeable".
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "from the strong place".
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "light".
  • Scottish Gaelic version of Andrew, meaning 'manly' or 'brave'.
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "one's own meadow".
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "defender of mankind".
  • Derived from Gaelic, meaning "handsome" or "cheerful".
  • A traditional Gaelic name, often used in Scotland.
  • Alba is the Scottish Gaelic word for Scotland.
  • Derived from old English, not directly linked to Scottish culture/language.
  • Ale
    Ale is a traditional Scottish beer made from malted barley.
  • Scottish variant of Alexander, meaning "defender of mankind".
  • Derived from a Scottish place, signifies "ford by the temple".
  • Derived from Old English, not directly linked to Scottish culture/language.
  • Ali
    No direct connection between "Ali" and Scottish culture or language exists.
  • Scottish origin, variant of Alexander, meaning "defender of mankind".
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "noble, bright."
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "noble, bright."
  • Associated with ancient Scottish kings and means "white" in Gaelic.
  • No direct connection between Alpine and Scottish culture or language.
  • Derived from old English, not directly linked to Scottish culture/language.
  • No connection between Amherst and Scottish culture or language exists.
  • Not connected to Scottish culture or language.
  • A revered early Welsh poet with Scottish ancestry.
  • A popular traditional Scottish male name, often linked to strength.
  • Commonly used in Scottish cuisine for flavoring traditional dishes.
  • Associated with Scottish Gaelic, meaning "grace" or "blessing".
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "genuine, bold".
  • Derived from Scottish meaning "true and bold".
  • A pattern from Scottish tartans, also a historic county.
  • Region in Scotland known for its Gaelic heritage and distinctive tartan.
  • Scottish Gaelic origin, meaning "bear", similar to Arthur in English.
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "bear" or "stone".
  • Derived from Old English, not directly linked to Scottish culture/language.
  • Associated with a Scottish clan, derived from a place in Scotland.
  • Not directly linked to Scottish culture or language.
  • Derived from a Scottish surname, often linked to noble heritage.
  • No connection between Baber and Scottish culture or language exists.
  • Derived from Gaelic, meaning "small bag", often used as a surname.
  • Derived from Gaelic, signifies "fair" or "white", often a surname.
  • Refers to a child or baby in Scottish dialect.
  • Associated with the Scottish surname "Baxter", meaning bread maker.
  • A Scottish surname derived from a village in Fife.
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "bald head."
  • A Scottish Gaelic form of Barbara, often used in literature.
  • Originates from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "birch tree meadow".
  • Refers to a traditional Gaelic poet in Scottish culture.
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "barley settlement" or "farm".
  • Associated with Scottish Gaelic word "baile" meaning town or settlement.
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "life" or "lively".
  • Scottish Gaelic form of Beatrice, a popular female name.
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "birch tree clearing".
  • Associated with strong, brave bear in old Scottish language.
  • A Scottish Gaelic form of Walter, meaning ruler of the army.
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, signifies "field" or "plain".
  • No connection between "Blaze" and Scottish culture or language exists.
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning light or public messenger.
  • Derived from Scots language, meaning attractive, pretty, or good.
  • A Scottish surname derived from Gaelic meaning "blond" or "fair".
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "from the Britons."
  • Derived from a place in Scotland, often used as a surname.
  • Associated with a famous Scottish king, Robert the Bruce.
  • Derived from Gaelic, meaning "quick" or "alert".
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "blacksmith".
  • Famous Scottish poet, celebrated annually with traditional supper.
  • Associated with Scottish dialect, meaning a rolling, trilled 'r' sound.
  • Derived from "Bright", a common surname in Scotland.
  • A traditional Gaelic name meaning "young dog" or "pup" in Scotland.
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning pure.
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "pure".
  • Derived from Gaelic, meaning "pure", often used in Scotland.
  • Derived from Gaelic, meaning "rocky water" or "stream".
  • Ancient Roman term for Scotland, often used in poetry and song.
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "dove", often used in Scotland.
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "winding valley".
  • Derived from Gaelic, meaning "crooked nose", traditionally a Scottish surname.
  • A prominent Scottish clan, known for their influence and power.
  • Means "crooked nose" in Scottish Gaelic language.
  • Derived from Scottish slang, meaning careful or cautious.
  • Derived from Gaelic, commonly used in Scotland and Ireland.
  • Derived from Gaelic, signifies a person living near marsh or water.
  • Derived from Scottish surname meaning "son of the marsh-dwellers."
  • Derived from Gaelic surname Ó Caiside, meaning "curly-haired."
  • Derived from Scottish surname, meaning "young wolf" or "church official".
  • Common nickname for Charles in Scotland, similar to Chuck in America.
  • A traditional Scottish dish made from mashed potatoes and turnips.
  • Derived from Scottish term for clerk, indicating a literate person.
  • A traditional Scottish pudding often made during Christmas or Hogmanay.
  • A major river in Scotland shares this name.
  • No connection between "Coby" and Scottish culture or language exists.
  • A traditional Gaelic name, often anglicized as Kenneth in Scotland.
  • Coira is a Scottish Gaelic version of the name Clara.
  • Derived from Gaelic, meaning "pup" or "young dog".
  • Derived from a Scottish surname, often linked to a clan.
  • A traditional Gaelic name meaning "strong wolf" in Scottish culture.
  • Associated with Scottish clan MacDhonnchaid, meaning "son of Duncan".
  • Derived from Gaelic, meaning lover of hounds, popular in Scotland.
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "hound of the plain."
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "seething pool" or "ravine".
  • Derived from Gaelic, meaning from the hollow or seething pool.
  • Associated with Scottish surname Corkindale, derived from Gaelic Corca Dala.
  • A common Scottish surname derived from Gaelic "MacEoghainn".
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "rock" or "crag".
  • A Scottish surname derived from a place in Midlothian.
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "place of the rocky hill".
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, often used as a diminutive for Christine.
  • Associated with small enclosed fields in Scottish Gaelic.
  • A Scottish Gaelic term, often used for naming places.
  • Derived from Gaelic, meaning "dark-haired one" in Scottish culture.
  • Dafty is Scottish slang for a foolish or silly person.
  • Associated with Scottish culture, meaning "oak tree" in Gaelic.
  • A feminine form of David, popular in Scotland.
  • Derived from David, a popular name in Scotland.
  • Associated with Scottish history as a title for guild leaders.
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "raging" or "broken-hearted".
  • No known connection to Scottish culture or language exists.
  • Derived from Gaelic, meaning "man from South Munster".
  • Derived from Scottish dialect, meaning ten-dollar bill.
  • A common Gaelic name meaning "dark stranger" in Scotland.
  • Derived from Gaelic, meaning "dark river", a prominent Scottish clan.
  • Derived from Gaelic, meaning "dark stranger".
  • Derived from "Draca", meaning dragon or serpent in Scottish Gaelic.
  • Derived from Gaelic, meaning "interpreter" or "messenger."
  • A surname originating from Scotland, meaning dark or swarthy.
  • A common surname originating from Gaelic, meaning "dark" or "black".
  • A traditional Scottish Gaelic male given name.
  • A popular Scottish given name derived from Gaelic elements.
  • A town in East Ayrshire, Scotland, known for cheese production.
  • A common surname originating from Gaelic meaning "brown".
  • Derived from Gaelic, meaning "horse brown", popular in Scottish folklore.
  • A traditional Scottish Gaelic name meaning "eagle".
  • Derived from Scottish surname Eton, meaning settlement on the river.
  • Derived from Old English, not directly linked to Scottish culture/language.
  • Derived from Old English, not directly linked to Scottish culture/language.
  • Derived from Gaelic, meaning rejuvenation or delight.
  • Derived from Old English, popular in Scotland during Middle Ages.
  • Derived from Old English, not directly linked to Scottish culture/language.
  • A diminutive form of Euphemia, popular in Scotland.
  • A character in Scottish Gaelic poetry and traditional folklore.
  • Derived from Scottish meaning "God is my light".
  • A traditional Scottish variant of the name Elizabeth.
  • Derived from Eithne, a name in Scottish and Irish Gaelic.
  • Eva
    Derived from Gaelic meaning "life", often used in Scottish names.
  • A popular male name originating from Scotland, meaning "born of yew".
  • Not directly linked to Scottish culture or language.
  • Associated with Scottish culture, often used as a surname.
  • A village in Scotland known for its royal palace and hunting grounds.
  • A traditional Gaelic name, often associated with Scottish Highland clans.
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "white shoulder".
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, symbolizing "peaceful strength."
  • Derived from Gaelic, meaning "man of vigor", common in Scottish history.
  • A traditional Scottish surname derived from Gaelic meaning "fair warrior".
  • Associated with a legendary Scottish hero in James Macpherson's Ossian poems.
  • Derived from Gaelic, meaning "fair-haired hero".
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "fair-haired hero".
  • Derived from Fionn, a Gaelic name meaning "white, fair".
  • Derived from Gaelic, meaning "white fire" or "white bull".
  • Originates from Gaelic, meaning "white" or "fair", common in Scotland.
  • Derived from Gaelic, signifies a person who makes arrows.
  • Associated with a Scottish heroine from the Jacobite Uprising.
  • Originates from a Scottish clan, meaning "field" in Gaelic.
  • A prominent Scottish clan and surname with French origins.
  • A surname originating from a Scottish clan in the Aberdeen area.
  • Derived from Gaelic, meaning "foreign help" or "helper of foreigners".
  • No connection between Garia and Scottish culture or language exists.
  • Derived from Gaelic, meaning "white hawk" in Scottish culture.
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "white hawk" or "battle hawk".
  • Derived from Gilbert, a popular name in medieval Scotland.
  • Derived from Scottish surname, meaning "son of Gilbert".
  • Gilbarta is a Scottish Gaelic form of the name Gilbert.
  • Associated with a place in Scotland, derived from Gaelic language.
  • Derived from Gaelic, meaning valley or glen.
  • Associated with Clan Guthrie, originating from Scottish highlands.
  • Derived from "Gordon", a prominent Scottish clan.
  • A prominent Scottish clan and region bear this name.
  • A traditional Gaelic name, often used in Scottish and Irish history.
  • A prominent Scottish clan and surname with historical significance.
  • Associated with Scottish clan Grant, meaning "grain" or "gravel".
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "large" or "great".
  • Derived from Scottish surname, meaning watchful or guardian in Gaelic.
  • A traditional Scottish female name, often featured in folk tales.
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, often used in traditional Scottish tales.
  • Derived from Old Norse, represents a Scottish clan from Highlands.
  • A traditional Scottish dish made from sheep's organs.
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "holy hair" or "holy face".
  • A popular Scottish variant of the name James.
  • Not connected to Scottish culture or language.
  • A diminutive form of Hector, popular in Scotland.
  • Derived from Gaelic "Eachann", meaning horse lord or brown horse.
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "home ruler".
  • Not directly linked to Scottish culture or language.
  • No connection between "Herman" and Scottish culture or language exists.
  • No connection to Scottish culture or language exists.
  • Associated with a prominent Scottish philosopher and historian.
  • Originates from Scottish surname, linked to hunting profession in medieval Scotland.
  • Associated with Scottish place names, meaning "wooded hill".
  • No connection between Hydra and Scottish culture or language exists.
  • Scottish Gaelic form of John, meaning "God is gracious".
  • Ian
    Scottish Gaelic origin, meaning "God is gracious".
  • Associated with Scottish Lowlands, represents English speakers in medieval Scotland.
  • A small island in Scotland known for its historic abbey.
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "island".
  • Scottish variant of Isabel, meaning "pledged to God".
  • Derived from Norse, popular in Scotland due to Viking influence.
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "yew tree" or "bow warrior".
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "God is gracious".
  • No connection between "Jeanne" and Scottish culture or language exists.
  • Derived from Jean, a Scottish form of Jane.
  • A diminutive form of Janet, popular in Scottish tradition.
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "dark-skinned" or "swarthy".
  • Derived from a Scottish place, often used as a surname.
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning slender or fair.
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "born of fire".
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "handsome" or "born of fire".
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "fair" or "handsome one".
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "dark" or "black-haired".
  • A Scottish surname originating from a place in Angus, Scotland.
  • A Scottish surname derived from Gaelic, meaning "head of the battle".
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "born of fire" or "handsome".
  • Means church in Scottish, often used in place names.
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "Christian" or "follower of Christ".
  • Derived from a Scottish Gaelic word meaning "narrow strait or channel".
  • Derived from Gaelic, signifies a girl from Scotland.
  • Derived from Gaelic, meaning "land of lakes", common in Scottish heritage.
  • A term of endearment in Scots, often used for young boys.
  • Derived from Gaelic, meaning "mare", often used in Scottish names.
  • No connection between "Lara" and Scottish culture or language exists.
  • Derived from Scottish term "lass", meaning young girl or maiden.
  • Associated with Scottish Gaelic, meaning "child" or "calf".
  • Derived from a Scottish place, signifies "field of elm trees" in Gaelic.
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "garden of hollies".
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "lily flower".
  • Originates from a Scottish place meaning "lime tree island".
  • Scottish Gaelic form of the name Louise.
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "little hollow".
  • Derived from a Scottish place name, popularized by a romantic novel.
  • Machara is a Scottish Gaelic term meaning plain or field.
  • Shortened form of Margaret, popular in Scotland.
  • Associated with Scottish culture, Magoon is a variant of MacGowan surname.
  • Derived from Gaelic, meaning "son of the beige one."
  • Scottish Gaelic form of Margaret, meaning "pearl".
  • A traditional Gaelic name, often used in Scotland.
  • Scottish origin, diminutive form of Margaret, meaning "pearl".
  • Associated with Scottish Gaelic, meaning "prince" or "chief".
  • Associated with Scottish folklore, often used in poetry and songs.
  • A feminine name of Scottish origin meaning "pearl".
  • Scottish Gaelic for "Mark", often used in Scotland.
  • A Gaelic feminine name meaning "pearl", popular in Scotland.
  • Derived from Gaelic, meaning "bitter" or "dark skinned".
  • Originates from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "Mack's stream".
  • May
    Derived from Scottish Gaelic, signifies "the cause of great joy".
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, signifies "son of the guardian of peace".
  • Associated with a Scottish clan and a character in Shakespeare's Macbeth.
  • A surname of Scottish origin, often linked to Gaelic Mac Pháidín.
  • A surname originating from Scotland, often linked to Clan Macfie.
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, signifies "son of the foreigner."
  • Originates from Gaelic, meaning "son of the smith."
  • A Scottish surname derived from the Gaelic "Mac Ghobhainn", meaning blacksmith.
  • Originates from Gaelic, meaning "son of grace" in Scottish culture.
  • A Scottish surname derived from Gaelic, meaning "son of the carpenter."
  • Originates from Gaelic surname MacAoidh, meaning "son of fire".
  • An Irish surname, not directly linked to Scottish culture or language.
  • Associated with Scotland, signifies "son of Ruff", a Gaelic surname.
  • Commonly used in Scotland, derived from Hebrew for "Who is like God?"
  • A Gaelic version of the name Mabel, common in Scottish heritage.
  • Derived from Gaelic, meaning "bitter" or "rebellious", popular in Scotland.
  • A traditional Gaelic name, often associated with Scottish heritage.
  • Derived from Gaelic name Maili, meaning "bitter" or "star of the sea".
  • Derived from Norman surname, linked to Gumer's Hill in Scotland.
  • Moose is not linked to Scottish culture or language.
  • Mór is a Gaelic term meaning great or big in Scotland.
  • A traditional female name originating from Scotland.
  • Associated with Gaelic tradition, often used in Scottish songs and poetry.
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "settlement near a moor".
  • A place in Scotland and a character in Gaelic poetry.
  • Derived from Gaelic, signifies "sea" and is a common Scottish surname.
  • Derived from Gaelic, meaning "descendant of the mill servant."
  • Associated with Saint Kentigern, patron saint of Glasgow, Scotland.
  • Associated with Scottish mountains over 3,000 feet, derived from Gaelic origins.
  • Associated with Scottish Gaelic, meaning "sea warrior".
  • A traditional Scottish male name meaning "sea warrior".
  • Derived from Gaelic, meaning "sea protector" or "mariner".
  • A common Scottish surname derived from Moray region.
  • Derived from Gaelic, meaning snake, often linked to Celtic mythology.
  • Derived from Gaelic, meaning "champion" or "cloud".
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, signifies "headland" or "promontory".
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "pure" or "lamb".
  • A nickname for the Loch Ness Monster, a famous Scottish legend.
  • Scottish Gaelic for "heavenly", often linked to Ben Nevis mountain.
  • No direct connection between Newbury and Scottish culture or language exists.
  • A term in golf, originating from Scotland, for a nine iron club.
  • Derived from Nicholas, a common name in Scotland.
  • Associated with a 5th-century Scottish saint and early Christian missionary.
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "honor" or "light".
  • Associated with Scottish clan MacEoghainn, meaning "son of Eoghan."
  • A traditional Gaelic name meaning "new speckled one".
  • Derived from Old Norse, not directly linked to Scottish culture or language.
  • Derived from Gaelic elements, meaning "deer lover" or "friend of deer".
  • Derived from Old English, popular in Scotland during Middle Ages.
  • Scottish Gaelic form of Patrick, often used in Scotland.
  • A town in Scotland and a traditional textile pattern.
  • Derived from Scottish, meaning "royal" or "noble".
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "Parson's son".
  • Refers to a person who plays the bagpipes, a Scottish instrument.
  • A patterned wool cloth worn in traditional Scottish attire.
  • Putter is a golf term originating from Scotland.
  • Quid is slang for one pound in Scottish currency.
  • Nickname for Robert Burns, Scotland's national poet.
  • Derived from Old Norse, commonly used in Scotland.
  • Derived from a Scottish place, meaning Ralph's town or settlement.
  • A traditional Scottish surname derived from a place in Huntingdonshire.
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, signifies "ruler's counselor" in Scotland.
  • Derived from Old Norse, used in medieval Scotland.
  • Associated with Scottish surname "Reid", meaning red-haired.
  • Derived from Scottish, meaning "red-haired" or "ruddy complexioned".
  • No connection between Remy and Scottish culture or language exists.
  • Derived from Scottish surname "MacRanald", meaning son of Ranald.
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "rough island".
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "strong hill fortress".
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, signifies "rough island" or "seal island".
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "red king".
  • Associated with Clan Rose, a Highland Scottish clan from Nairnshire.
  • A common surname and region in Scotland, derived from Gaelic.
  • Roy
    Derived from Gaelic, meaning "red" or "king".
  • Means "red" in Gaelic, often used in Scottish names.
  • A colloquial term for a Scotsman, derived from Alexander.
  • Derived from Scotland, represents its whisky, tape, and people's dialect.
  • Derived from a Gaelic term meaning "Gaelic speaker".
  • A reversed spelling of Agnes, common in Scottish tradition.
  • Derived from a Gaelic term, often linked to old river names.
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "God is gracious".
  • Derived from Gaelic, meaning "God is gracious", common in Scotland.
  • Derived from Gaelic, meaning "God is gracious" in Scottish culture.
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "God is gracious".
  • Shug is a Scottish nickname for Hugh.
  • Sim
    Derived from Simon, a common name in Scotland.
  • A traditional Scottish dish made from oatmeal, onions, and fat.
  • Derived from Gaelic, represents "health" and is a popular female name.
  • Derived from Gaelic, meaning "brightness" or "radiance" in Scotland.
  • Derived from Scottish, meaning "stony forest clearing."
  • Steenie is a Scottish nickname for Stephen, popular in literature.
  • Derived from Scottish town Stirling, also refers to British currency.
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "household guardian".
  • Associated with a royal family that ruled Scotland and England.
  • Derived from Gaelic, meaning "pleasant" or "small hero".
  • Derived from Gaelic, often used as a nickname for Thaddeus.
  • A traditional Scottish ballad about a man saved from fairies.
  • Derived from Gaelic, meaning "hill" or "elevated place".
  • Patterned cloth representing Scottish clans, used in kilts and other garments.
  • A Scottish Gaelic term, meaning "God's helmet".
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning "twin".
  • A traditional Scottish name meaning "twin".
  • A hybrid fruit, named after Scotland's River Tay.
  • Derived from a Gaelic word, meaning "little poet" or "attractive".
  • Symbolizes Scotland's national emblem, representing bravery and protection.
  • Refers to something small or tiny in Scottish slang.
  • Derived from Old Norse, used in Scotland meaning "God of Battle".
  • Surname of a famous Scottish freedom fighter, William.
  • Associated with famous Scottish author Sir Walter Scott.
  • Derived from Gaelic, meaning "son of Walter" in Scotland.
  • Derived from Gaelic "uisce beatha", meaning "water of life".
  • Associated with a fish species popular in Scottish cuisine.
  • Derived from Scottish surname, meaning "white island" in Old English.
  • No direct connection between Wickham and Scottish culture or language.
  • Derived from Old Norse, signifies a settlement near a creek in Scotland.
  • A surname of Scottish origin meaning "crafty" or "beguiling".
  • Derived from Scottish Gaelic, meaning narrow passage or strait.

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statistics

How popular are Scottish Dog Names?

Scottish Dog Names currently rank in 49th place out of all PupNames.com categories.

As of July 2024, scottish dog names seem increasingly popular with new puppy owners. Our stats show that they are more fashionable than they were at this time last year.

We've seen quite a lot of variation for this category, which suggests its popularity could be seasonal or based on cultural events.

Which are the cutest and most unique Scottish Dog Names?

These scottish dog names range from cute to badass, and from traditional to unique. Click each circle to see the name.

Henry is among the cutest of these. If you prefer tougher, edgier dog names, the one considered the most badass is Hydra.

Iver scored high for its uniqueness, which would help your dog to stand out. But if you prefer more common, old-fashioned names, the more traditional option here is Jack.

How does interest compare across the United States for Scottish Dog Names?

The map below compares each state by the number of people browsing Scottish Dog Names.

The states that love scottish dog names the most are South Dakota, Vermont and Montana.

The least amount of interest in this category was registered in Georgia, Washington and Oklahoma.

Which countries have the most love for Scottish Dog Names?

Here's a world map showing the popularity in each country of scottish dog names.

Who'd have thought?! Some of the countries you might not have thought about that LOVE scottish dog names are Brunei, Oman and Spain.

On the flip, PupNames data shows there's not much interest in Philippines, Taiwan and China.

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